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Stand By Me


Ace and his gang arrive to claim the body and threaten to hurt the boys if they stay. When Chris insults Ace and doesn't back down, Ace draws a switchblade. Gordie gets the gun, fires a warning shot, and stands beside Chris while pointing the gun at Ace. Ace demands the weapon, but Gordie refuses while insulting and threatening him. Ace and his gang vow revenge and leave. The boys realize it's wrong to exploit Ray Brower's death and instead report it via an anonymous phone call. They walk back to Castle Rock and part ways.




Stand By Me


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Feldman recalled how his home life translated into his onscreen character: "[Most kids aren't] thinking they're going to get hit by their parents because they're not doing well enough in school, which will prevent them from getting a work permit, which will prevent them from being an actor."[3] O'Connell agreed that he was cast based on how his personality fit the role, saying "Rob wanted us to understand our characters. He interviewed our characters. [...] I tried to stay like Vern and say the stupid things Vern would. I think I was Vern that summer."[21] Reiner and the producers interviewed more than 70 boys for the four main roles,[16] out of more than 300 who auditioned;[21] Phoenix originally read for the part of Gordie Lachance.[21] Ethan Hawke auditioned for Chris Chambers.[22]


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When the storms of life are raging,Stand by me (stand by me);When the storms of life are raging,Stand by me (stand by me);When the world is tossing meLike a ship upon the seaThou who rulest wind and water,Stand by me (stand by me).


In the midst of tribulation,Stand by me (stand by me);In the midst of tribulation,Stand by me (stand by me);When the hosts of hell assail,And my strength begins to fail,Thou who never lost a battle,Stand by me (stand by me).


In the midst of faults and failures,Stand by me (stand by me);In the midst of faults and failures,Stand by me (stand by me);When I do the best I can,And my friends misunderstand,Thou who knowest all about me,Stand by me (stand by me).


In the midst of persecution,Stand by me (stand by me);In the midst of persecution,Stand by me (stand by me);When my foes in battle arrayUndertake to stop my way,Thou who savèd Paul and Silas,Stand by me (stand by me).


When the other boys are finally able to drag Teddy away, he is crying. "He raked my old man," he bemoans. The other boys try to comfort him, but older Gordie inserts that he couldn't understand why Teddy cares so much about the father who tried to kill him, while he doesn't care about his own father who never laid a hand on him.


In a 2011 interview with NPR, Wil Wheaton attributed the film's success to the director's casting choices: "Rob Reiner found four young boys who were the characters we played. I was awkward and nerdy and shy and uncomfortable in my skin and sensitive, and River was cool and smart and passionate and even at that age kind of like a father figure to some of us, Jerry was one of the funniest people I had ever seen in my life, either before or since, and Corey was unbelievably angry and in an incredible amount of pain and had a terrible relationship with his parents." Parts of the film were shot in Brownsville, Oregon, which stood in for the fictional town of Castle Rock. Scenes that include the mailbox baseball and the junkyard scenes were filmed in Veneta, Oregon. The junkyard is still in operation. The campout/standing-guard scene was filmed in Eugene, Oregon, just a few miles from Veneta. The general store is in Franklin, Oregon, just north of Veneta. Scenes along the railroad tracks were shot near Cottage Grove, Oregon, along the right-of-way of the Oregon, Pacific and Eastern Railway, now used as the River National Recreation Trail. The scene where the boys outrace a locomotive across a trestle was filmed at Lake Britton on the McCloud River Railroad, near McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, California. While attending a test screening at Columbia Pictures, Stephen King was reported to have been shaking and not responding or even speaking which led to him going out after the first 20 minutes because he was so impressed.


Another of the standout aspects of the film is its soundtrack, which marks a departure from much modern anime. Peppered with indie-rock tracks with English lyrics, the film has a timelessness that marks it out from its contemporaries, and helps to deepen our reaction to and understanding of the themes explored.


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Still, no matter how old you are or how many times you've seen the movie, there's plenty you may not know about the story behind the production, which is often as funny and haunting as the tale told on screen. Pop open some cherry Pez and read on.1. You might not think of Adrian Lyne (of "Flashdance" and "Fatal Attraction" fame) as the director best suited to Stephen King's tale of innocent boyhood, but he was the first filmmaker attached to the project. Fortunately, he was too busy making "9 1/2 Weeks," so the gig went to Reiner (above, left), then fresh off "This Is Spinal Tap" and "The Sure Thing."2. Reiner's auditions for the four leads yielded boys whose personalities matched their roles. "I was awkward and nerdy and shy and uncomfortable in my own skin and really, really sensitive," Wheaton recalled in 2011, "and River was cool and really smart and passionate and -- even at that age -- kind of like a father figure to some of us. Jerry was one of the funniest people I had ever seen in my life, either before or since, and Corey was unbelievably angry and in an incredible amount of pain and had an absolutely terrible relationship with his parents."3. As the narrator, the adult version of Wheaton's character, Reiner cast actor David Dukes. But he felt Dukes' performance was off, so he tried "Spinal Tap" star Michael McKean. He didn't work either, so Reiner cast his own high school pal Richard Dreyfuss.4. The independent studio behind the film was Embassy, owned by Reiner's "All in the Family" mentor, Norman Lear. But when Lear sold Embassy to Coca-Cola, the new management decided the movie wasn't commercial enough. So it pulled its financing just two days before the shoot was scheduled to begin. Fortunately, Reiner got Lear to pony up the full $8 million budget out of pocket.5. The boys were never really in danger during the famous train-dodge scene. Part of the scene involved stunt doubles -- women with close-cropped hair made up to look like the boys. And part of it involved an extra-long telephoto lens to make it look like the train was right behind the boys when, actually, it was still on the far side of the bridge.6. The swamp used in the leech scene was man-made, a pond dug out and filled with water by the production crew before the shoot. By the time Reiner was ready to film the scene, it was already overgrown with moss. The leeches were real.7. The four young stars got into plenty of misbehavior during their down time. Wheaton rigged the coin-operated arcade games at their hotel so that they could be played for free. Reiner says Phoenix (then 15) lost his virginity to a Phoenix family friend during a night away from the hotel. Feldman says he and Phoenix both smoked pot.8. And Kiefer Sutherland, who played bully Ace, claims that O'Donnell tied his babysitter to a bannister, escaped to a Renaissance festival, and ate some cookies that he didn't realize we're laced with pot. The others found him in a parking lot, woozy and crying.9. The movie was originally titled "The Body," after the Stephen King story it was based on. The film's marketers worried that it sounded like a horror movie, a bodybuilding film, or a porno. Reiner came up with the title "Stand by Me" based on the Ben E. King standard that he'd picked to play out over the end of the film.10. Lear's $8 million investment turned out to be a smart move. "Stand By Me" earned back $52 million at the box office.11. The movie's Maine countryside scenes were actually filmed in and around Brownsville, Oregon, where there is now a tourist center devoted to the film. Reiner named his production company Castle Rock after the movie's fictional town.12. The "Stand by Me" screenplay was written by Raynold Gideon and Bruce A. Evans, who'd written the sci-fi romance "Starman." They earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay, the only Oscar nod "Stand by Me" received. They also earned a compliment from Stephen King, who said it was the first filmed version of one of his stories that got it right. 041b061a72


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